Auctions and property inspections are back up and running in the nation’s two largest property markets, Sydney and Melbourne. As Omicron case numbers surge, some restrictions remain in place across several states and territories. 

In-person auctions and open homes have resumed in New South Wales and Victoria. Picture: Getty.

Here’s a state-by-state breakdown of what real estate activity each government is currently permitting.


New South Wales

Most premises are now open to everyone, regardless of whether they are fully vaccinated or not, however some restrictions remain.

Face masks are mandatory in indoor areas for all people over the age of 12, and people must check-in at some venues.

Here’s what it means for real estate across the state.

  • There are no longer any density limits for how many people can attend an auction or inspect a home for sale or lease.
  • There are no vaccination requirements for agents or buyers attending open homes, however some agents and owners may choose to require people to be fully vaccinated as a condition of entry.
  • Masks are not mandatory but are strongly encouraged where you cannot socially distance.
  • People no longer need to check-in when inspecting a home.
Lockdown restrictions have eased for fully vaccinated adults across NSW. Picture: Getty.


Victoria

From 11:59pm January 6, some restrictions were introduced across Victoria.

Under the current rules, density limits of one person per two square metres have been reintroduced indoors at hospitality and entertainment venues.

Face masks are required indoors, except at home, for everyone aged 8 and over, unless exempt.

Here’s what it means for real estate activity across Victoria.

  • There are no vaccination requirements for people attending real estate inspections, however real estate agents must be fully vaccinated (unless exempt).
  • There are no density limits for open homes.
  • Face masks are mandatory indoors. If outdoors, a face masks must be carried at all times.
In-person inspections can now take place across Greater Melbourne. Picture: Getty.


South Australia

Level one restrictions are currently in place across South Australia.

Home inspections and live auctions are currently allowed to take place under the following guidelines:

  • Open homes and inspections must adhere to the one person per two square metre rule.
  • Masks are mandatory where social distancing is not possible.
  • Real estate agents must have a COVID-safe plan in place, including an approved contact tracing system such as a QR code.
  • Strict hygiene standards must be maintained
Open homes and auctions in South Australia must adhere to the one person per two square metre rule. Picture: Getty.


Queensland

From 17 December, new restrictions came into effect for people in Queensland who are not fully vaccinated.

Unvaccinated residents will no longer be able to visit vulnerable settings, such as hospitals and aged care facilities, or attend hospitality and entertainment venues. In addition, these venues will no longer have density limits, with only fully vaccinated people permitted.

From January 2, masks must be worn in all indoor settings, except in your own home or where it is unsafe, such as while doing strenuous exercise.

Home inspections and live auctions are allowed to take place in Queensland under the following guidelines:

  • Open homes and auctions are permitted and people do not need to be fully vaccinated to enter.
  • A density limit of one person per two square metres applies for indoor areas.
  • Agents must collect contact information and follow the government’s COVID-19 safe checklist.
  • Masks must be worn in indoor settings.
Auctions and house inspections are allowed to take place across Queensland. Picture: Getty.


Western Australia

WA remains in a State of Emergency, but there are no longer any capacity restrictions on open homes and inspections, provided they follow COVID-safe measures.

Under the current restrictions:

  • Open homes and inspections must have no more than one person per two square metres.
  • Real estate agents are also required to maintain a mandatory contact register for staff and visitors and must follow social distancing and hygiene requirements.
Western Australia remains in a State of Emergency. Picture: Getty.


Northern Territory

Home inspections and in-person auctions are allowed to take place under the following guidelines:

  • In-person inspections and auctions are permitted.
  • All people must check in using the Territory Check-In App, no matter how long they spend at the venue.
  • Real estate agents must have a COVID-19 safety plan in place and provide hand sanitiser.
  • People are encouraged to follow hygiene standards and physical distancing rules by keeping 1.5 metres from people they don’t live with.


Tasmania

Home inspections and in-person auctions are allowed to take place under the following guidelines:

  • Up to 250 people are allowed to attend a home inspection or auction per undivided indoor space, or up to 1,000 people per undivided outdoor area, including staff and children. The total number of people at a premise cannot exceed one person per two square metres.
  • All attendee names and contact details must be recorded for contact tracing purposes.
  • Real estate businesses must implement measures to meet the minimum COVID-19 safety standards and record this in a COVID-19 Safety plan.


Australian Capital Territory

Home inspections and live auctions are currently allowed to take place under the following guidelines:

  • If there are 25 people of fewer across the venue, no density limit applies.
  • If there are more than 25 people a density limit of one person per four square metres per indoor space, or one person per two square metres per outdoor space applies. Outdoor spaces are capped at 300 people. Density limits exclude real estate agents or staff in the count.
  • People must check in using the Check In CBR app.
  • Face masks must be worn indoors by people aged 12 years and over, unless exempt.

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